College Students Are Eligible for SNAP

How to know if you qualify for SNAP

If you are a student enrolled at least half-time in a higher education institution (college, university, trade/technical school) and meet one of the following criteria, you may receive SNAP benefits if you meet all other SNAP eligibility criteria:

  • A student who is eligible to participate in state- or federally-funded work-study during the school year
  • A student who has an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) of $0 in the current academic year (any student who receives the maximum Pell Grant has an EFC of $0).

These temporary extensions will expire 30 days after the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE) ends. The PHE has been extended through mid-January. An updated version of this information will be made available with the most current exemptions.

Here’s what you need to know about your eligibility for SNAP enrollment:

Students eligible to participate in state or federally funded work-study during the school year may be asked to provide:
  • A copy of your financial aid award letter to show you are eligible for work-study. You can find this letter in your school’s financial aid portal or request it from your financial aid office and/or advisor; or
  • A letter from your school indicating that you are eligible for work-study.

You can also submit a request to your school to confirm your work-study eligibility directly to your state’s SNAP agency.

Students who have an Expected Family Contribution (EFC) of 0 in the current academic year may be asked to provide:  
  • A copy of your financial aid award letter or your Student Aid Report (SAR) to show that you have an EFC of 0;
  • A letter from your school indicating that you have an EFC of 0; or 
  • A copy of your financial aid award letter or letter from your school displaying the Pell Grant amount you’ve received.

You can also submit a request to your school to confirm your EFC amount to your state SNAP agency. Financial Aid Administrators may use unemployment documentation — including receipt of unemployment benefits or letters from the state unemployment agency — to reduce or adjust to 0 the income earned from work for you or your parents.

As a Texas student, you should never have to choose between school and a meal.

Apply for SNAP!